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the relationship between behavior, attendance, + academics

sequencing matters

When we view all behavior through a lens of trauma and commit ourselves to building strong relationships, we see the by-products of increased attendance and improved academics — because students show up for the adults who believe in them.

 

APPROACH

In my work, whether it’s at the school site level with staff, or with district or county leadership, my approach always begins with relationship building, and deep listening.

While there may be core components of cultivating trauma responsive school environments, each school and each district is a unique community. As such, I always prioritize in-person conversations to discuss needs and how the outcome of implementing trauma informed climates will be mission-aligned. At the center of all of this is developing relationships where all stakeholders feel seen, heard, valued, and safe.

Further, I am deeply committed to the idea that we cannot discuss trauma without also talking about racial injustice. While data show trauma ‘doesn’t discriminate’ – that it affects us all regardless of socio-economics, race, gender, or age – research shows the experience of trauma is not evenly distributed. People of color experience/d additional traumas related to historical and systemic racism, oppression, and disenfranchisement, which need not only to be acknowledged, but also recognized as needing a culturally relevant response. Healing from trauma is never a one-size-fits all.


RYSE Youth Center, based in Richmond, CA,  has added the contextual layers of historic and institutional racism to the  Adverse Childhood Experiences Pyramid.

RYSE Youth Center, based in Richmond, CA, has added the contextual layers of historic and institutional racism to the Adverse Childhood Experiences Pyramid.